Raven’s Rock

Raven 015

When we built our house in these mountains, we blasted a hole into a huge rock boulder and built inside it. Today we call our place Raven’s Rock because of a resident Raven that came to our front deck after our grandson, Pete’s, funeral. My book “We Are Different Now” is about Pete’s falling to his death in the wee hours of July 5, 2010 at the tender age of 21.

At Pete’s outdoor memorial service, a Raven was sitting in a tree above the musician’s tent and when the service began, it flew to the top of the gazebo where the priest and minister were giving the service. It stared out over the crowd of 300+ people who attended and then flew out and over the people and away. Many people noticed and commented on this phenom. A Raven came to our house that day and has been here daily for the three years since Pete left us. This is his picture.

It is raining today and the Raven is just sitting out there quietly in the rain and has been for hours, so I decided to photograph it. I was surprised and pleased to see that the cross on the mountainside up near the overlook also shows up. In the Native American culture (my maternal great-grandmother & my paternal great-grandfather were both half-Cherokee), the Raven is said to portend magic and can shape shift and bring healing energy, thoughts and messages or intentions. I recently learned that the Raven is the patron of Smoke Signals, which is what I named my monthly newsletter for my writing business. How ironic that I chose that name without knowing this.

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About jtzortman

The author of "WE ARE DIFFERENT NOW" - A Grandparent's Journey Through Grief and first place award winning fiction novel "FOOTPRINTS IN THE FROST", I am also a contributing author in the anthologies "Felons, Flames & Ambulance Rides", "American Blue", "Recipes by the Book: Oak Tree Authors Cook" and "The Centennial Book of The National Society of Daughters of the Union 1861-1865". I've had numerous articles, poems and short stories published since 1990. I am a Charter Member of the Public Safety Writers Association and a member of the Rocky Mountain Fiction Writers. I have won 9 writing awards. I live in a quaint Colorado mountain tourist town with my husband and Siamese cat and when deeps snows blanket the terrain and spectacular views from my windows, it becomes the perfect spot in which to write.
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6 Responses to Raven’s Rock

  1. Marilyn says:

    Love the picture of the raven on the rock. Great vignette, as well. Thanks.

  2. jtzortman says:

    Well, well, well…SPEEDY is truly the right nickname today. 🙂 And you even threw out the word “vignette”, too. Glad you left me a message. Hugs.

  3. Debbie Cooper says:

    Jackie..As always love your blog…….Your writings are always so soothing and personal to read……Love you…………..

  4. mmgornell. says:

    Love the picture (of course I would!), the name Raven’s Rock, and the way you built your home–so marvelous about the Raven’s comfort (at least that’s how I’m looking at it.) Congrats on your book, and much success.

    Madeline

    • jtzortman says:

      Yes, I did think that you would love my raven picture. Nice way to think about him/her enjoying comfort at our house, especially in the rain. I’m in the midst of your book “Counsel of Ravens” and can hardly put it down. I always love to hear that from someone who is reading my own book and bet you feel the same. I’m taking it with me tomorrow when we have the car serviced because it’s supposed to take an hour. Thank you for stopping by my blog and leaving a comment for me. Much success to you, as well.

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